About Andrew Hay

Andrew Hay is an information security industry veteran with close to 20 years of experience as a security practitioner, industry analyst, and executive. As the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) at DataGravity, Inc., he advocates for the company’s total information security needs and is responsible for the development and delivery of the company’s comprehensive information security strategy.

Andrew has served in various roles and responsibilities at a number of companies including OpenDNS (now a Cisco company), CloudPassage, Inc., 451 Research, the University of Lethbridge, Capital G Bank Ltd. (now Clarien Bank Bermuda), Q1 Labs (now IBM), Nokia (now Check Point), Nortel Networks, Magma Communications (now Primus Canada), and Taima Corp (now Convergys).

Andrew is frequently approached to provide expert commentary on security-industry developments, and has been featured in such publications as Forbes, Bloomberg, Wired, USA Today, International Business Times, Sacramento Bee, Delhi Daily News, Austin Business Journal, Ars Technica, RT, VentureBeat, LeMondeInformatique, eWeek, TechRepublic, Infosecurity Magazine, The Data Center Journal, TechTarget, Network World, Computerworld, PCWorld, and CSO Magazine.

Please join SANS Institute Instructor and LEO Cyber Security Co-Founder & CTO Andrew Hay and Infoblox Security Product Marketing’s Sam Kumarsamy on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 1:00 PM EDT (17:00:00 UTC) as they present a SANS Institute webinar entitled Detect & Prevent Data Exfiltration: A Unique Approach. Overview Data is the new currency in the modern digital … Continue reading Detect and Prevent Data Exfiltration Webinar with Infoblox

The post Detect and Prevent Data Exfiltration Webinar with Infoblox appeared first on LEO Cyber Security.

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The False Sense of Security: SSL Visibility & Decryption on the Network Edge with Andrew Hay, Senior Analyst, The 451 Group With the recent SSL Certificate Authority breaches, our inherent trust in SSL has been compromised. For the same reasons SSL is optimal for insuring privacy and confidentiality, it has become an avenue for hackers to exploit in order to penetrate networks that lack visibility into that encrypted traffic. Headlines on the Comodo, KPN and DigiNotar breaches have called the ability for SSL to provide trustworthy authenticity into question. Authenticity is not optional for secure communication. Can we afford to put our...

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